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The world got a little less zany yesterday with the death of Phyllis Diller at age 95.

If you’re old enough to have grown up watching the “Queen of Comedy” on TV, in movies or on stage, you’re probably of one of two minds: She was either great or grating. Hers was that sort of polarizing style and talent.

Perhaps because of that, she made an enduring impact on the entertainment business and is credited with paving a path for later generations of female comedians. She also became a uniquely memorable character to audiences she reached and touched, whether while entertaining troops overseas in USO shows, or making one of her frequent appearances on the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. 

In reading news reports and media tributes, I was struck by a few themes that defined Diller’s comedic persona. It dawned on me that there are hallmarks to her career that can serve as lessons and inspiration for us marketers, as we strive to create memorable impact and differentiated positioning in a crowded, noisy marketplace.

Here are a few of my takeaways. Perhaps you’ve got some of your own. If so, please share them in a comment.


Short and punchy works — but also takes work. 
Especially with the rise of social media and community management, balancing long-form, value-adding content with plenty of concise, well-crafted, information-rich tweets, comments, updates and replies is a critical ingredient in today’s marketing mix.

What bears noting is that these short-form snippets deserve as much strategic thought and professional care as your e-books, webinars, white papers and infographics.  

Skim through these Phyllis Diller quotes assembled into a slide show by the Huffington Post. Diller clearly had a knack for the punchy, high-impact, 140-character comment long before Twitter.

Now picture that behind each line was (I’m assuming) a team of talented, professional comedy thinkers and writers, evaluating every word and polishing every phrase until the result crackled and sparkled. You get the sense Diller wouldn’t have entrusted her Twitter stream or Facebook updates to the new intern. This is the work of subject-matter experts. Communications pros.


Dare to stand out
Simply by virtue of her gender, Diller was different for her time, and therefore bound to stand apart from her male comedy contemporaries. But she elected to go one step (OK, several steps) further to appear distinctive and attract attention. From her cackling laugh to the platinum-colored wigs and cigarette holder, you know when she walked through a curtain or delivered a punch line that this was Phyllis Diller.  

Which isn’t to say your content should be packaged and presented in a way that is garish. But, ideally, you have a vision for a design look-and-feel, and an editorial voice, that are reflective of a differentiated brand image and personality you want to establish in the marketplace. And you’re adhering to that visual identity and editorial voice consistently with the content you create. 


Empathize

Much of Diller’s humor was grounded in empathy for issues faced by her audience, particularly women. When she talked about burying her laundry mistakes in the backyard, her inability to cook, her trials and tribulations with fictitious husband Fang, she was signalling to fans: “I know that life, relationships and raising children are full of challenges, hard work and heartaches.”

Based on that empathy, Diller could offer her audiences poignant observation and comic relief.

What you can offer with content is insight, solutions, case examples, tools, peer-to-peer community…and maybe a little humor and fun, as well. 


Embrace the “un-sexy”
With her knobby knees, crazy hair and heavy eye makeup, Phyllis Diller cut a less-than-sexy figure on stage. But that was part of what made her interesting and engaging. Someone able to make us stop and pay attention. Eager to study what she looked like, sure. But also to hear what she had to say.

Let’s face it, many B2B products and services are, purely on their own, not inherently “sexy.” But the best content marketing focuses not on the product or service itself, but on the challenges and opportunities the audience has in their professional lives and businesses. It’s in the context of diving into and exploring those often nitty-gritty, specialized, highly technical issues and objectives that your product or service can eventually emerge as looking smart, sexy and desireable. 

That’s why you’ll see companies such as Indium (which makes solder) and Miller Electric (which manufactures welding equipment) able to exert such a strongly attractive image and presence with their B2B content marketing. 

Because they understand that smart and sexy are in the eye, heart and head of the beholder.

RIP, Phyllis.

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This post, originally published on Hanley Wood Marketing’s Content Is Marketing blog, is cross-posted here for subscribers to Touch Point City. For more marketing ideas and insights from my colleagues at HWM, subscribe to Content Is Marketing.

If you lead a marketing team, you know how challenging it can sometimes be to get contributions to your content marketing program from internal subject matter experts (SMEs).

Here’s what I often hear from corporate marketers on this subject:

You ask SMEs to contribute an occasional content asset, or even simply to brainstorm some meaty topics. Suddenly the most competent and confident engineers, consultants, scientists, technicians — experts and highly articulate in their respective disciplines — become wallflowers. Ghosts. Invisible men and women. Seemingly too busy, bothered or bewildered to contribute much (or at least as much as you’d like) to your content marketing effort.

Why is that?

For starters, most of your colleagues are busy with their day jobs. So unless content planning and creation suddenly gets added to their job description and performance objectives, it will often take a back seat to other assignments and priorities.

But there’s another reason: Like engineering, medicine, architecture, supply chain management or any discipline around which a person might have SME knowledge and insight, content planning, creation and curation is a specialty, too. It draws on remarkably diverse know-how and skills, including some mystical combination of strategic thinking, problem solving, creativity, storytelling, research, reportage, writing, editing, design, art direction, business acumen, audience empathy, and maybe dozens of other ingredients.

Sad to say, because someone is an outstanding SME, doesn’t automatically make them a prolific, skillful content creator.

Research by the Content Marketing Institute and MarketingProfs finds that the biggest challenges B2B marketers face when it comes to content marketing are generating valuable content, and generating enough content.

I’m convinced a major factor underlying those twin challenges is this: Corporate marketers who absolutely want to execute a robust, ongoing content marketing strategy, but find themselves unable to get enough SMEs to contribute on a consistent basis.
 

A Content Marketing Secret Advantage

The bad news? This post won’t help you solve the problem of getting SMEs involved and contributing. Although we’ll keep working on it, as it’s one of the problems we’re often called upon to help clients solve. Follow Content Is Marketing for future posts on and around that topic.

The good news? There’s at least one way CMOs can use content marketing, starting now, to get the right people on board and contributing effectively. It’s an advantage in this case for the same reason content marketing can be such a challenge for SMEs: Because being able to generate and execute content ideas isn’t something everyone can do, do well, and do consistently.

So, what’s the secret edge CMOs can gain from content marketing?

Use it as a screening tool when hiring.

That’s right. As you sort through candidates for that next opening — looking for something by which to separate one from the other, and on which to predict their future performance — consider giving them a homework assignment.

Challenge them to come back to you with a description of a big-idea content strategy and program, one that would set your organization apart from the competition and engage your most important audience(s) as never before.

Or, if you’ve already got a significant content strategy up and running, ask them to pitch you four or five ideas for new content assets. What would the topics be? Where would you find the subject-matter expertise on which to base the content? In what format would each asset deliver? Where would they fit in the audience’s consideration and buying continuum for your product or service?

I’m convinced one of the best ways to know whether a job candidate has the ability to understand a company’s value proposition, target audience, and the sales and marketing dynamics of your category, is whether they can imagine content that would engage your audience while complementing your brand and being a catalyst for growing your business.

Theoretically, using content marketing as hiring tool will help you build a staff that is better equipped to support you in at least three important ways:

  • Solicit, edit and manage what contributions you can get from those busy (reluctant?) internal SMEs.
  • Generate content on their own.
  • Manage external content marketing resources and partners.

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What do you think — good idea? Have you used this sort of approach to get a feel for a job candidate’s content marketing abilities and potential? If so, tell us what sort of assignment you gave them and how it turned out.

This post, originally published on Hanley Wood Marketing’s Content Is Marketing blog, is cross-posted here for subscribers to Touch Point City. For more marketing ideas and insights from my colleagues at HWM, subscribe to Content Is Marketing.

If you haven’t noticed, marketing automation is on a steep adoption curve.

Yesterday came news from marketing consultancy Raab Associates, reported here in BtoB’s e-newsletter, that marketers are expected to spend more than $500 million on marketing automation (MA) systems in 2012, with vendors Eloqua, Marketo, Infusionsoft and HubSpot to account for more than half of that spending.

Interestingly, the MA boom forecast for this year comes after an almost-as-robust 2011, when MA spending climbed 50 percent above 2010 levels, according to Raab, which advises clients on making MA purchases.

Marketing Automation Warnings and Worries

In light of MA’s popularity, what’s interesting is just how much online hand-wringing exists regarding MA — especially cautions to corporate marketers about how not to make a big mistake when investing in MA software.

Do a quick search on a term such as “marketing automation mistakes” and you’ll find plenty of posts, discussions and top-10 lists of things to beware of and avoid. It starts to sound as though MA should come packaged with a warning label.

And that might not be such a bad thing.

Because if you boil down all the pros, cons and concerns, the theme that tends to repeat is this:

Be prepared, or you’ll likely regret the purchase.

What cautionary voices seem to be saying (including some of the MA vendors themselves, to their credit) is that you’re asking for trouble and disappointment if, before you adopt MA, you’re not first squared away on such fundamentals as:

  • Business strategy
  • Audience personas and buying process
  • Market positioning
  • Content strategy
  • Lead qualification criteria
  • Lead management process (especially the interplay between sales and marketing)

In other words, some rather big, hairy marketing considerations. 

Prepare for Marketing Automation, then Purchase

Basically, it’s a get-your-ducks-in-a-row-or-else caution that persists around MA, despite it’s growing adoption. A warning that even the greatest technology can’t salvage weak or absent strategy, alignments and processes. A heads-up that without content, even the best marketing engine will lack fuel to generate the lead-management horsepower needed to drive a brand and business forward. 

I like the way Forrester analyst Jeff Ernst put it in this interview with Marketing Automation Times: Essentially, Ernst says, it comes down to having a handle on lead-to-revenue process, content, and measurement. Get those ducks in a row. Then, by all means, you might be ready to make the most of MA.

And what if it’s too late? You’ve already implemented MA, and it’s not delivering the ROI you expected?

Strategy and content are probably more to blame than technology.

Time to reverse engineer.

Time to start wrangling some ducks.

This post, originally published on Hanley Wood Marketing’s Content Is Marketing blog, is cross-posted here for subscribers to Touch Point City. For more marketing ideas and insights from my colleagues at HWM, subscribe to Content Is Marketing.

It’s a fundamental premise of blogging for inbound marketing. In other words, blogging to drive search engine optimization and lead generation.

  1. Identify a core set of words and phrases that support the marketing positioning you wish to own.
  2. Publish posts about topics in which you reference those keywords.
  3. Optimize each post by including one of your keywords or phrases in the title, meta description and the post content itself.
  4. Repeat frequently and consistently over time, and you’ll likely rise in search results when prospective customers search on your keywords.

If this sounds smart and familiar, or if it’s a recipe you’re now following, that’s great. As I wrote at the top, it’s a fundamental premise of blogging for SEO and lead gen. It proven to work. And it’s solid, legitimate inbound marketing strategy.

But here’s where it can go seriously wrong:

When you’re so focused on “owning” a narrow set of keywords, and so intent on posting about topics for which your company provides solutions, your posts start to sound artificial. Programmed. Mechanical.

Like one of those wind-up monkeys, banging the little cymbals.


Pounding Away at Monotone Themes

Do you know a corporate blog that looks and sounds like that? I do. I did a quick analysis of the firm’s last dozen posts. I had to squint to identify much of a difference between most of the titles. Made me wonder why they didn’t just combine a dozen posts into two or three. But we know why: Because search engines reward those who publish content frequently.

Will all the pounding away at a few positioning keywords help this firm rise in search rankings? Probably.

But I wonder if it also sends a message. Will customers and prospective customers find value and credibility in the posts? Will they see a service provider truly interested in connecting with them at a strategic level, ready to listen to their objective and challenges? Or will they see a marketer following a formula? Gaming the online marketing system, to a degree. Simply to get found in search. 

If you’re taking this approach on purpose, your audience probably will notice. Whether they’ll see it as a positive or a potential negative, well, that’s for you to find out.

Don’t be surprised if our friends at Google notice, too. They have a way of updating their algorithm to reward those who publish relevant, engaging content. Don’t be shocked if they identify, and find ways to foil, marketers who publish content around keywords by rote.


Make Music. Don’t Monkey Around.

How can you keep your blog content from getting too narrow and mechanistic, driven more by SEO than by striving to add value and stimulate conversation within the community you’re seeking to build? Here are three ways:

  • Elicit, don’t dictate, topic ideas: If the person who manages your blog is doling out most of the topics to post contributors, that could become problematic. Ideally, you want contributors coming forth with plenty of original insights and perspectives. Ideas which strike them as useful, entertaining or important to share with your audience. That’s how your blog will sound like an orchestra, as opposed to a pounding, repetitive percussion section.
  • Focus on people more than words. Are you spending lots of time thinking about keywords and how to weave them into future posts? Make sure you or someone spends even more time and effort thinking about your audience. Write posts that speak to their concerns and interests, let keywords find a proper place, and your blog will be more valuable and engaging.
  • Think click through, not just search rank. Climbing the search rankings is important. At some point what you hope is going to happen will happen: Someone, maybe a lot of someones, will click through and read your blog. When they do, what will they discover? A collection of thin, similar-sounding posts that could have been produced by a content farm? Or will they find your people, personality, passion, ideas, questions and maybe even some expertise on display. Varied. Multifaceted. Sometimes even funky.

If you monkey around with blogging, focusing on a narrow set of keywords and posting incessantly on very similar sounding topics, your audience might end up experiencing mostly noise.

And even when it emanates from the top of a search engine ranking, noise is still noise.
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What do you think? Does what I’m suggesting fly in the face of smart, efficient content strategy and inbound marketing? Or do you, too, believe value and sense of community get drowned out in the racket when a blogger appears to be posting primarily for SEO?

This post, originally published on Hanley Wood Marketing’s Content Is Marketing blog, is cross-posted here for subscribers to Touch Point City. For more marketing ideas and insights from my colleagues at HWM, subscribe to Content Is Marketing.

A little of the right content goes a long way toward converting a new customer — especially as you get near the bottom of the sales funnel.

I was reminded of this truism recently while researching contractors to perform tree work around my home. A few too many years of growth, nature’s whim and weather wear-and-tear had left my wife and I with a handful of trees in need of either removal or grooming.

The city where I live publishes a list of licensed tree contractors. Plus, I consulted a few neighbors for referrals. Based on preliminary research, I called three contractors.

At this point I’m deep in the funnel. My trees need work. I’ve gone to the trouble of contacting a service provider and asking for an estimate. I’ve spent 30 minutes or more touring the yard, talking through the needs of each tree, asking when the work can be done.

Yet in each case, I was struck by how casual, to the point of lackadaisical, these service providers were about the project scoping and estimating process.

  • No. 1 arrived on a motorcycle, a quote sheet folded in his pocket. I loaned him a pen and a clipboard with which to jot down the work scope and estimate.
  • No. 2 scrawled his estimate across a price sheet, neglecting to use any of the preprinted lines and boxes for labelling the trees to be worked on or entering rate amounts.
  • No. 3 offered me a brochure, which seemed like progress. Then he proceeded to scribble his scope and estimate in the brochure’s narrow margins.

Missing in Action: Bottom of the Sales Funnel Content

I was willing to overlook a few rough edges. After all, these guys are hustling to do estimates in the evenings after long days working hard on current projects. We’re standing out in a breezy back yard, not sitting comfortably across a desk in an air-conditioned office. Theirs is a blue-collar business built more on technical know-how and physical capability than formalities.

But where the sales process truly fell apart, in each case, was when I requested what seemed to me was the barest minimum of content. Content that would give me confidence in them and their ability to perform the work. Content that would help me differentiate one from the other.

  • Their contractor license number
  • Proof of insurance
  • Names and contact information for 2 or 3 customers they’d worked for in the past

Mind you, I wasn’t expecting to get this info on the spot, in a die-cut folder overflowing with four-color sell sheets and glowing testimonials. I was willing to receive it as a follow-up via phone or e-mail. None of the contractors has a website, so directing me online was not an option. Still, if they’d had a typewritten sheet of paper back in the truck (or the motorcycle saddle bags), that would have been fine.

Each contractor made a point of saying he’d been in business locally for decades. But you’d have sworn I was asking for content no prospect had requested before. 

No. 1, the motorcyclist, said he’d follow up with the info but never did. A few unanswered calls leaves me wondering if he is currently licensed and insured. Though I was most impressed with his tree-side manner, he won’t be getting the business.

No. 2 hasn’t responded, but I’m still following up because at least his wife returned my call while he was away on vacation. No. 3 hasn’t called or e-mailed since. Meanwhile, his tri-fold brochure, while speaking to his longevity in business, lacks the information (and assurance) that I’m seeking.

Suffice to say, if any of these three businesses had provided me with the content I wanted, when I was seeking it, they would have had me as a customer. Makes you wonder how many more years they’ll go in business without putting together a simple content asset that will answer the questions I asked, and thus position them for greater success at the bottom of the sales funnel.

Is Your Content Ready to Convert?

Granted, these are local contractors, not mid-size or large corporations. No doubt your company’s resources and commitment to deliver bottom of the sales funnel content about your brand, products, services and people is far advanced from these small — micro, really — businesses.

Or is it?

  • Does the standard brochure and presentation you’ve been relying on for years answer the questions today’s prospective customers are asking as they’re about to make a purchasing decision?
  • When was the last time you systematically surveyed your sales force to learn what might help them close more deals as prospects get down to the wire, ready to decide among vendors and price quotes?
  • Better yet, when was the last time you interviewed customers and prospective customers, to better understand their decision-making concerns and criteria, and then crafted deep-funnel content to address those questions? 

We marketers spend lots of time, energy and resources trying to get more opportunities into the top of our funnels.

Which makes you wonder if we’re focusing enough on the other end, close to the funnel’s bottom.

Where a little of the right content can go a long, long way.
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This post, originally published on Hanley Wood Marketing’s Content Is Marketing blog, is cross-posted here for subscribers to Touch Point City. For more marketing ideas and insights from my colleagues at HWM, subscribe to Content Is Marketing.

It might be the most challenging communication to craft — and the most important — in any lead management program:

The email you deliver immediately after, or soon after, someone has accepted one of your advanced content assets (e.g., participated in a webinar, downloaded a podcast or an e-book, etc.).

It’s a moment of truth. Will this next communication invite them further into engagement with your brand, push them away, or leave them feeling and acting neutral, but open to further nurturing communications?

A Lead Management Email Fail

An experience I had last week serves as a perfect example of how NOT to craft that follow-up email.

The e-book I’d downloaded seemed relevant and promising enough: New research commissioned by a technology company (let’s call them WhizBang Communications) on best practices in mobile marketing. Then came the email:

Subject: Thank you for your interest in WhizBang Communications!

Having been focused on the content of the e-book itself, not the name of the firm which produced it, I didn’t immediately recognize the company name. Normally that would cause my spam antennae to vibrate and I’d simply delete the email without opening it. But for some reason, in a moment of weakness, I clicked to open.  

First paragraph: Thank you for your interest in WhizBang Communications! With over 400 clients spanning verticals including retail, grocery, CPG, financial services, healthcare, telecom, and utilities, WhizBang’s multi-channel communications platform delivers integrated…

“Stop. Hold it right there,” I said to myself. “Now I know who WhizBang Communications is. You’re the company which produced that e-book I downloaded just a few minutes ago.”

Sure enough, I went back to my desktop to check the e-book. It was, indeed, from WhizBang. But you wouldn’t have known it from the email. And therein lay the problem: I’d downloaded the e-book because of my interest in getting smarter about mobile marketing — not because I was interested in WhizBang.

Right there, in a split second, momentum stopped. Any sense of dialogue, stopped. Trust, barely beginning to sprout, stopped. Because WhizBang’s follow-up communication violated the first rule of of lead generation:

When I’m at the top of the funnel
and I accept your content,
my interest is in my need, and your content,
not your company or its products.

Continue the Conversation 

You can bet I won’t be calling or replying to the person who’s name is at the bottom of WhizBang’s email. And, in fact, I haven’t even read the e-book. I’m now officially turned off. As a lead, you can officially score me “cold.” And it didn’t have to go this way.

Here are at least four things WhizBang could have done with this all-important communication to keep the potential for further engagement alive. To keep what could have been a conversation, going. See if they make sense for your lead management program.

  1. Entice me to consume the content I’ve already accepted. Interestingly, the follow-up email didn’t mention the e-book at all. Plus, it arrived so soon, there was a good chance I’d yet to even read the e-book. What WhizBang’s marketing team could have done is highlighted some of the most intriguing research findings contained in the e-book, giving me greater incentive to consume, maybe even share, that initial piece of content.
  2. Offer me more content. Instead of hitting me with gobbledygook about WhizBang, the follow-up communication could have invited me to a webinar, or to download case studies about businesses similar to mine that are having success with mobile marketing. I’d probably have accepted that next content call to action, and by doing so moved one step further into the funnel.
  3. Speak to me about my issue. Rather than thank me for my interest in WhizBang (of which I had none), the email could have commiserated with me about the challenges faced by marketers when it comes to mobile marketing. Maybe it could have quoted from the research, letting me know I’m not alone in facing these challenges. And then it could have invited me to call or email if I had questions after reading the e-book and digesting the research.
  4. Don’t send the email. WhizBang could even have elected to not send the email, which is sometimes the best follow-up communication of all. After all, I’m not even remotely a warm lead for them at this point. This is the first time I’ve downloaded a piece of their content. We’re not even on a first-name basis, at least in my mind, and yet their email feels as though they are asking me out on a date.

Lead Management Rule No. 1? Take extreme care with that follow-up email after someone first accepts your content. Assume they’re interested in their issue, and your content, but not your company. And craft your communication accordingly.
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This post, originally published on Hanley Wood Marketing’s Content Is Marketing blog, is cross-posted here for subscribers to Touch Point City. For more marketing ideas and insights from my colleagues at HWM, subscribe to Content Is Marketing.

Every so often you hear an idea or a message that resonates immediately and powerfully. This post is about one of those times.

It happened during a Trend School conducted by researchers and analysts from The Intelligence Group. Their theme for this seminar: Innovation. More specifically, what it takes for brands to be valued as innovative, relevant, even “best friends forever” by Gen X, Y and (yes, believe it or not, they’re here among us) Gen Z consumers.

Early in the half-day seminar, lead presenter Allison Arling-Giorgi (if that last name sounds familiar, Allison’s my daughter in law) delivered this talking point, intended as something of a North Star for product managers and brand marketers to follow.

To achieve breakthrough innovation with today’s younger consumers…

“Operate in the culture, not in the category.”

As a case in point, she cited Kodak and Instagram. One sees (saw?) itself as a film manufacturer. The other as a facilitator of fun and easy sharing of life’s relationships, activities and memories via social media.

Key to operating in the culture, of course, is understanding what an audience thinks and feels. That made this particular talking point a perfect pivot into Allison’s subsequent slides on Gen X and Y attitudes and influences. 

But later, as she was describing the aftereffects on Gen X of having been latchkey kids, and explaining why Gen Y still feels mired in the recession, at least half of my brain was still mulling the earlier call to action.

Operate in the culture, not in the category.

If that’s the key to innovation, is it not also central to effective content marketing?

Great Content: Audience Focused, Culturally Grounded

I believe it is.

After all, a tenet of effective content marketing is that your content (at least a good deal of it, especially the closer you get to the funnel’s brim) must be far less about you and your products and services, and much more about them (your audience) and their pain points and possibilities.

What better way to sharpen your strategy, to strive for engagement breakthrough, than to create content that positions you to be your audience’s resource, ally, even “BFF” where and how they work and live (“in the culture”)? At the same time, how critical is it when creating content to reach far beyond the product features and promotional messages that traditionally define competition and differentiation “in the category”?

Besides Instagram, the Trend School presentation offered several other examples of brands operating in the culture to deliver product and service innovation, and in the process invite brand affinity:

  • Intel, with its What About Me? app, which lets users create personalized infographics of their digital lives.
  • Jay Z and Powermat, collaborating to integrate mobile device charging mats into the music mogul’s 40/40 Club.
  • J. Crew, where Creative Director Jenna Lyons is virtually living, looking and curating the brand aesthetic and experience.
  • Etsy, the online marketplace for all things crafty and handmade, launching a scholarship program for women who wish to become coders and hackers.
  • Method, which imbued character and “story” into its new line of cleaning products.
  • Google, with its Project Re:Brief, a remake for the web of iconic TV ads.
  • Zappos, welcoming headquarters visitors like old friends, providing tours, etc.
  • Foldit, where the crowd is finding solutions to come of science’s gnarliest puzzles.

Notice how many of these case examples are, essentially, content marketing. Or at least close cousins of content. IF, that is, you define content similarly to how I do:

“Value-adding information, interactions and experiences by which brands engage, create momentum and build affinity with audiences vital to their success.”

Next time you evaluate your content strategy, or brainstorm that next round of advanced assets you hope will add value for your audience, ask yourself:

Are we still thinking and operating purely in category? Or are we out there, in the culture? 
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Not familiar with The Intelligence Group? They’re a self-described “youth-focused consumer insights and trend research company,” built on discovering and interpreting what younger generations think, do, feel and buy. The firm delivers its insights and interpretive services via multiple “Cassandra” branded products and services, including:

  • Cassandra Report. A subscription-based, ongoing, regularly updated consumer trend study.
  • Cassandra Live: In-person “Trend School” seminars.
  • Cassandra Daily: A free daily trend e-newsletter (a personal favorite of mine). 
  • Cassandra Solutions: Proprietary research using an online community of hand-recruited consumers for custom client projects.

This post, originally published on Hanley Wood Marketing’s Content Is Marketing blog, is cross-posted here for subscribers to Touch Point City. For more marketing ideas and insights from my colleagues at HWM, subscribe to Content Is Marketing.

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